Java / NLJUG

209 Videos

Exclusive Q&A – James Gosling

The godfather of Java: James Gosling was invited to the Netherland by Blue4IT, AWS and the NLJUG at the Amazon Web Services office in Amsterdam. On 17 October 2018 multiple developers saw a chance to ask their questions of James Gosling. Which resulted in a very interesting view of the past, present and future of […]

J-Fall 2018: Opening movie

J-Fall 2018 heeft ruim 1.500 Java professionals mogen ontvangen voor de beste sessies en workshops over Java in de bioscoopzalen van Pathé Ede. De dag startte met de early bird sessies, maar de echte opening begon met deze film. Alle lof voor de maker van deze film: Michiel van MediaTaal ( http://www.mediataal.com/ ) Met trots presenteren we jullie […]

J-Fall 2018: Aparna Chaudhary – Docker, JVM and CPU

With the increasing adoption of cloud native technologies and containerization; the gap between Java development and system administration is decreasing. Whether you are using Docker Swarm, Kubernetes or Mesos/Marathon as a container orchestrator; fundamental challenges for running docker in production are common. In this talk, I would like to share some of the basic linux […]

J-Fall 2018: Ansgar Brauner & Sebastian Gauder – A competitive food retail architecture with microservices

Three years ago we started refactoring a monolith into a microservice platform. We want to share the lessons we’ve learned the hard way and provide some answers to problems we ran into: What kind of organization helps to reflect the vertical boundaries in software while your team grows? How do you define bounded contexts with […]

J-Fall 2018: Roy Braam & Hilario Trindade – Going from nothing to production within an hour @ the Rabobank

What does it mean for a big financial company to go large scale to the public cloud? What effect has this on the 200+ teams? What is needed to enable teams migrating their services from an on-premises modular monolith to a microservices architecture based on PCF, while ‘keeping the shop open’? We will share our […]

J-Fall 2018: Bruno Borges – A Look Back at Enterprise Integration Patterns and Their Use into Today’s Serverless Computing

Functions, and the so called serverless computing have freed deveopers from worring about infrastructure, and even upper platform layers, as well some steps in the software development lifecycle. But once you have functions deployed, how do they interact with each other? How message navigates between them? Maybe, just maybe, it’s time to look back again […]

J-Fall 2018: Rene Boere – The cool stuff about front-end development and platform engineering

De ontwikkelingen op het gebied van front-end gaan razendsnel. Gebruikers communiceren via meerdere kanalen met back-end systemen, via web-interfaces maar ook via apps en REST interfaces. 24×7 beschikbaarheid is de norm. Een nieuwe release? Graag volledig geautomatiseerd getest en snel naar productie. Hoe ontwikkel je op een professionele manier een front-end? Hoe ga je om […]

J-Fall 2018: Jettro Coenradie & Byron Voorbach – Learning to rank search results (Combine Machine Learning with Search)

With advanced tools available for search like Solr and Elasticsearch, companies are embedding search in almost all their products and websites. WIth more experienced users but also with smaller screens to show search results, returned the right results to a query becomes more demanding. Search engines provide lots of ways to influence the order of […]

J-Fall 2018: Berwout de Vries Robles – Impromptu Orchestra

In recent years there have been some large developments in web technology. The introduction of HTTP/2 in 2015 has given new life to Server Sent Events as Reactive Streams. To explore these technologies with you, I have made an application that turns the audience into an orchestra using Reactive Streams. In the talk we will […]

J-Fall 2018: Peter Hilton – Flat HTTP API Documentation

The way we write API docs is highly structured, natural to programmers, and wrong. HTTP API documentation typically looks nothing like the requests and responses it describes. This creates extra work for the reader to understand the documentation structure, and figure out how to translate that to code. It also makes it harder to spot […]